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What Can History Tell Us About Current Health Inequalities?

Professor Simon Szreter, Professor of History and Public Policy at St John’s College, University of Cambridge, will provide the Behaviour and Health Research Unit's annual lecture on June 4th.
When Jun 04, 2015
from 06:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where Downing College
Contact Name Organised by Centre for Science and Policy, University of Cambridge
Attendees Please register below.
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This lecture will argue that history shows how the nature and scale of health inequalities within a society are produced by the social and cultural environment of values and incentives experienced by the rich, as much as by the poor, who are the usual focus of attention. This environment can be and has been modified dramatically several times by the forces of ideology and politics during the last half millennium of British history. It therefore follows that our current trend of widening inequalities can be modified once again – by focusing on the values and incentives of the rich.

Professor Szreter's research focuses on History and Public Policy, especially in relation to comparative demographic, social and economic change.

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