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All in a day’s work

last modified Jun 14, 2018 11:15 AM
Simon Deakin, Catherine Barnard and Brendan Burchell of the Cambridge Public Policy SRI are helping to understand the world of work – the good, the bad, the fair and the future.

It’s an undeniable truth that getting ‘work’ right is as good for people as it is for the nation. Good work results in a healthy, fulfilled, safe and fairly paid workforce. It contributes to increasing productivity, better living standards and economic growth.

It’s also true that discussions of ‘work’ in politics and the media have often been highly charged. This is certainly the case today. Technological change, gender relations, Brexit and new models of working such as the gig economy are all factors that are changing the world of work.

Read more about the research here or see the full article in Research Horizons: Download

 

Professor Simon Deakin (Centre for Business Research, Cambridge Judge Business School, and Faculty of Law), Professor Catherine Barnard (Faculty of Law) and Dr Brendan Burchell (Department of Sociology).

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